Discoveries
Neuroscience
Neuroscience
New technologies are allowing us to explore the brain as never before. We are entering a new era in neuroscience where our knowledge of the brain is beginning to match the urgent need to prevent and treat diseases of the brain.

Neuroscience

Neuron
10/11/2017

Ensuring good cellular connections in the brain

Astrocytes are brain cells that, among other things, help neurons form active connections with each other. The exact mechanism behind this process has been a mystery. Scientists in Nicola Allen’s lab have begun to uncover more about these important cells. Allen and first author Isabella Farhy-Tselnicker discovered that astrocytes initiate communication between pairs of neurons by prompting specific changes in neurons through a protein called glypican 4. This protein influences both sending and receiving neurons, helping them make synaptic connections. It may be a target for better understanding neurodevelopmental disorders, such as autism, ADHD and schizophrenia, all of which may result at least partially from faulty communication between neurons. The work was published in Neuron on October 11, 2017.

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Cell Reports
10/17/2017

“Busybody” protein may get on your nerves, but that’s a good thing

Sensory neurons regulate how we recognize touch and pain as well as body movement and position, but neuroscientists are only now beginning to unravel this circuitry. New research from Kuo-Fen Lee’s lab, co–first authored by Zhijiang Lee and Christopher Donnelly, and in collaboration with researchers at the University of Michigan, shows how a protein involved in many different signaling pathways plays a key role in pain signaling in the brain. This “busybody” protein, called p75, enhances the survival of proteins that support sensory neurons involved in transmitting pain signals. When p75 is removed, the survival-promoting signal of these proteins is reduced and the neurons that respond to this signal gradually degenerate. These findings could lead to new insights into neurological disorders, as well as spinal cord injuries and other traumas. The work was published on October 17, 2017, in Cell Reports.

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Science
11/09/2017

Fruit fly brains inform search engines of the future

Every day, websites and apps crunch huge sets of information to find data points that resemble each other, such as products that are similar to past purchases. These tasks are called similarity searches, and performing them well—and fast—has been an ongoing challenge for computer scientists. Salk faculty Saket Navlakha and Charles Stevens, together with collaborator Sanjoy Dasgupta of UC San Diego, have shown that fruit fly brains, in their efforts to identify similar odors, may have found a better way to perform similarity searches. Current computer algorithms find similar items by reducing the amount of information associated with each item. Fly brains do the opposite, expanding the amount of information associated with each item, which allows them to better distinguish similar from dissimilar. When the researchers applied this approach of expanding rather than reducing information associated with data to three standard datasets, they found the fly method dramatically improved search performance. They reported their findings in Science on November 9, 2017.

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Neuron
12/07/2017

When your spinal cord takes charge

We think the brain masterminds our actions, but a surprising amount of movement-related information is processed in the spinal cord. When we move, motor circuits in the spinal cord are constantly barraged by information from sensory receptors in the skin and muscles, information as varied as what our limbs are doing or what the ground underfoot feels like. This information is critical for actions like walking or standing still. Researchers in Martyn Goulding’s lab have solved a long-standing mystery about how spinal cords know when to pay attention to certain pieces of information and when to ignore them. Goulding, first author Stephanie Koch and others, in work published in Neuron on December 7, 2017, showed that specific neurons, called RORβ interneurons, inhibit the transmission of potentially disruptive sensory information during walking, allowing for a fluid gait.

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Cell Reports
01/02/2018

When the brain’s support cells aren’t so supportive

Early in human development, neurons make a flurry of connections that are then pruned back to fine-tune the brain. Assistant Professor Nicola Allen and UC San Diego graduate student Matthew Boisvert discovered that genes that get switched on to sever these early connections between neurons are later activated again in support cells called astrocytes. Named for their star-shaped appearance, astrocytes make up one-third to one-half of all brain cells and are critical for neuronal function. By comparing gene expression in astrocytes in adult and aged mouse brains, the team uncovered that a genetic program is reactivated as astrocytes age, causing neurons to lose connection with each other. The discovery, which appeared in Cell Reports on January 2, 2018, hints that astrocytes may be  good therapeutic targets to prevent or reverse the effects of normal aging.

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Aging Cell
01/07/2018

Alzheimer’s drug turns back clock in cellular powerhouse

The experimental drug J147, a synthetic, modified version of the curcumin molecule found in the spice turmeric, is almost ready for human trials. The lab of Dave Schubert developed J147 while looking for plant compounds that reverse cellular and molecular aging in the brain. Since then, the team has shown J147 reverses memory deficits, drives the production of new brain cells and slows or reverses Alzheimer’s disease progression in mice. Now Schubert, first author Josh Goldberg and their colleagues have figured out how J147 works: in a study published in Aging Cell on January 9, 2018, they reported that the drug binds to an enzyme called ATP synthase, which is found in our cells’ power-generating organelles (mitochondria). The team showed that, by manipulating ATP synthase activity, they could protect brain cells from multiple toxicities associated with aging. Unraveling J147’s mechanism of action is a critical step towards clinical trials in humans.

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