Discoveries
Regeneration
Regeneration
Many disorders and life-threatening diseases could be cured by replacing or fixing dysfunctional cells. We aim to uncover novel ways to provide new tissues and cells to the body while minimizing organ rejection.

Regeneration

Genes & Development
11/21/2017

Multifunctional protein contributes to blood cell development

Researchers in Martin Hetzer’s lab found a previously unknown role for a protein called nup98. In addition to helping control how certain molecules move in and out of a cell’s nucleus, nup98 helps direct the development of blood cells, enabling immature blood stem cells to differentiate into mature cell types. The team described their discovery in the December 21, 2017, issue of Genes & Development. Hetzer, first author Tobias Franks and collaborators found that when perturbed, this differentiation process can contribute to certain leukemias, making nup98 a potential target for new cancer therapies.

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Genes & Development
12/21/2017

Getting straight to the heart of the matter in stem cells

The process by which embryonic stem cells develop into heart cells is complex, involving the precisely timed activation of several molecular pathways and at least 200 genes. Now, Salk Professor Kathy Jones and first author Conchi Estarás, alongside their colleagues, have found a simpler way to go from stem cells to heart cells that involves turning off a single gene, called YAP. The work, which appeared in Genes & Development on December 21, 2017, offers scientists a streamlined method to arrive at functioning heart cells (cardiomyocytes) for both research and regenerative therapies.

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